Your Path is Your Path

My MIL would often say that any time she delivered a powerful Bible study, the Lord would give her a chance to live it out on her own. I couldn’t help but think on her words after writing my last blog post. #15 of my “30 before 30” list was “write your schedules in pencil, both physically and mentally. Life will disrupt your plans.” Boy, have I gotten an opportunity to use my eraser.

I spent a significant portion of time adjusting—then re-adjusting–the youngest’s schedule to accommodate her taking her first college class. Candidly, I knew I was going to have to break it to her that I had to take back her discovery day, so I was trying to make the revised schedule as uncomplicated as possible. Five shorter days rather than four longer ones—that’s a good trade, yes?

Well, it all looked fabulous until…

  • My revisions limited her window for dance training during the day.
  • The newer schedule didn’t easily allow us to continue serving at the urban farm.
  • We agreed, along with extended family, that my MIL now needs a little more assistance during the day, stretching my husband a little thinner.
  • The doctor’s appointment I set two months ago is on the same day, and at the same time, as the youngest’s college class this week.

So, after some back-and-forth with my husband, we figured it out. Equally importantly, the two of us along with the youngest have a workable schedule (for more details, see my curriculum choices and page).

 

 

What I now notice is that, on days when we can, we sleep a little later (maybe until about 8 a.m.), we start a bit after 9, and she is finished around lunch time. We read in the afternoon, and sometimes again later in the evening. The late start and early finish (relatively speaking) begs the question that I think all homeschooling parents ask occasionally: are we doing enough?

I find myself wondering about the extra hours in a day. When there were three children, or even two, it seemed as if I had much more to do. I find myself thinking, even about my own time. It is hard trying to be Mary in this Martha-praising world.

My conclusion? Our path is our path (and the same is true of you). And what is far more critical than filling hours that might feel “wasted” because we can actually take a nap or read a book if we want to, is being obedient to our season. I do not have to fill the afternoon with a list of additional “things” in order to feel accomplished. It is okay to decide what is rewarding and meaningful for us and to leave the rest for others. The word “intentional” has become almost cliché-ish, but yes, focusing on our family helps us win as a unit.

I even detailed my personal reading list for my bullet journal, and I am tracking whether or not I sit daily to enjoy a book. I am resting, writing, reading and gardening; life could be sweet.

 

 

(Did I mention that she is thinking about getting a job? Oy).

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2 thoughts on “Your Path is Your Path

  1. These words among others resonated with me “It is okay to decide what is rewarding and meaningful for us and to leave the rest for others. The word “intentional” has become almost cliché-ish, but yes, focusing on our family helps us win as a unit.” Yes! I need to take a breath and remember this. Thank you 🙂

    1. I am glad it was meaningful for you, Moncia. We all get caught up in what our lives are SUPPOSED to be based on some ridiculously fake standard, and it can be disheartening to the REAL work that is before us–being a blessing to those around us in simple, perhaps intangible, everyday ways. Thanks for stopping by.

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